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Editing for Grammarphobes 2.0: Weather Words

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Every Wednesday, Editing for Grammarphobes 2.0 features handy tips to enhance all of our writing, from daily emails to articles to books. After all, everyone needs to write, right?

POSTED BY KAREN WOJCIK BERNER


Since I live in Chicagoland, a place that can experience all four seasons in one week, I thought these first few days of spring in the northern hemisphere would be a perfect time to discuss weather words. I kid you not. Today's temperature is 38°. Friday, it's supposed to be in the low-70s.
The Associated Press Stylebook 2016 has an excellent section that bases its definitions on those used by the National Weather Service. Here’s a sampling of some weather words, what they mean, and when to use them.

Blizzard
A snowstorm is officially a blizzard if it has wind speeds of 35 mph or more, plus considerable falling and/or blowing snow with visibility of less than one-quarter mile for three or more hours. 

Cyclone, funnel cloud, tornado, water spout
A cyclone is a storm that ha…

Editing for Grammarphobes 2.0: The Letter 'N'

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Every Wednesday, Editing for Grammarphobes 2.0 features handy tips to enhance all of our writing, from daily emails to articles to books. After all, everyone needs to write, right?

The letter “N” has some definite quirks. For example, did you know there’s an “e” in noticeable? And that’s just the beginning. Here are some interesting things about words that begin with “N.”

Naturalist, naturist

A naturalist is one who studies natural history or an amateur who observes, photographs, draws, or writes about nature. 
A naturist is a nature worshipper or a nudist. 
Nauseous, nauseated

People often say something made them nauseous. Technically, that’s incorrect. Whatever is nauseous induces the feeling is nausea, according to The Chicago Manual of Style. The actual act of feeling sick to one’s stomach is to be nauseated. 
CMS recommends skipping nauseous altogether and sticking to nauseated and its adjective form of nauseating. I think that’s a pretty safe bet. 
Naval, navel

Naval refers to the N…

International Women's Day Strike

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In solidarity with my sisters participating in the A Day Without a Woman Strike, Editing for Grammarphobes will not be posted today. Please stop back next week for our usual blog discussing grammar hints and tips.

Thank you.



It's Read an E-book Week

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As part of "Read an E-book Week," all three of my novels, as well as my Christmas digital short story, are FREE on Smashwords from today until March 11.

A ton of Smashwords authors, publishers, and readers are participating in this week-long celebration that offers thousands of free and deeply discounted e-books of all genres. It's a reader's paradise! Learn more about "Read an E-book Week" here and here
You'll need the Smashwords coupon codes to get the Bibliophiles books for free, so here you go. 



If you're on Twitter, the hashtags to follow are #ebookweek and #Smashwords. While you're there, feel free to visit me, too.

Happy Reading!

Editing for Grammarphobes 2.0: Mmm Mmm Good

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Every Wednesday, Editing for Grammarphobes 2.0 features handy tips to enhance all of our writing, from daily emails to articles to books. After all, everyone needs to write, right?

Can you believe it’s March already? The first part of the year just flies by. Before you know it, it will be Tax Day. Ugh. 
Well, since this is the first day of March, let’s talk about some words that begin with the letter “M.”
Mantle, mantel
A mantle is a cloak or, as the Merriam-Webster Dictionary states, “a figurative cloak symbolizing preeminence or authority,” as in the mantle of leadership.
A mantel is a shelf above a fireplace.  Mashup or mash-up?
There is conflicting advice on whether or not this word should be hyphenated. The Associated Press Stylebook states it is one word, while Merriam-Webster states it’s hyphenated. 
In this case, I would go with the dictionary, since a lot of AP Style deals with saving space and column inches. I’d use mash-up to describe a blending of two or more pieces of con…

Introducing Editing for Grammarphobes Digest

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Love all of the grammar hints of Editing for Grammarphobes 2.0, but don't have time to check the blog every week?
Sign up for EFG Digest, a monthly recap of all Editing for Grammarphobes 2.0 blog posts in one convenient newsletter! 
EFG Digest will be delivered on the last day of each month starting with February. After you sign up, please add my email address, karen@karenberner.com, to your list of contacts, so your monthly EFG Digest doesn't end up in your spam folder. 







Editing for Grammarphobes 2.0: Valentine's Day Edition

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Every Wednesday, Editing for Grammarphobes 2.0 features handy tips to enhance all of our writing, from daily emails to articles to books. After all, everyone needs to write, right?


Yesterday was Valentine’s Day, so while you’re coming off from your sugar high, I thought I’d share some words associated with the holiday and their correct spelling and/or usage.

Valentine’s Day
Yes, there is an apostrophe in Valentine’s Day. It comes from the original St. Valentine’s Day, which mandates the possessive, as do some unhealthy relationships.

Also, please do not say Valentimes, as I’ve heard mispronounced so often throughout my life. It’s just not right.

Valentine
Merriam-Webster offers three definitions for the word “valentine.” The first is “a sweetheart chosen or complimented on Valentine’s Day.” Next is “a gift or greeting sent or given especially to a sweetheart on Valentine’s Day; especially a greeting card sent on this day.” Lastly, it can mean “something (as a movie or piece of writing…